Overconfidence vs. situational awareness



[…]
When properly programmed and used, GPS has incredibly accurate position reporting capability, which can prove to be a lifesaver, literally. The next reporter, the pilot of a long-range amphibious airplane on a ferry flight across the Pacific Ocean, tells a “GPS rescue” story:

“While we were ferrying the aircraft, the left engine began backfiring severely and would not develop power. Engine was brought to the power required to attempting to maintain best altitude. An immediate turn was made for the nearest land, and our “Pan” emergency shifted to a “Mayday” call. After about an hour, descent into the water was imminent. After the successfully water landing, we began taking on water. Seven people escaped without injury into a lifeboat.                 
Coordination with ATC  and very accurate position reporting with GPS resulted in a very expeditious rescue by the Coast Guard and a maritime vessel. We were in the ocean less than one day”                    

It is obvious from these reports that automation is critical to success no matter what your aircraft type, so let’s take a closer look at automation discipline and how we can improve it.
It is difficult to make any definitive recommendations that will work in all cases, but there are several areas that emerge from studies that all of us might want to consider.
First, we must recognize the potential for problems. Man and machine are still strange bedfellows, we rely on them, but we must be able to preserve our autonomy, which leads to the second point.
Pilots need to understand all the intimate details of the automation on their aircraft, understanding enough to trust the system while at the same time maintaining a watchful posture. Accident and incidents analysis indicate some pilots harbor a secret distrust of automation, but even more frightening is that apparently some pilots no longer trust their own skills. This leads me to my third point.
Until they replace our pilots wings with “automation-system-manager” badges, we must maintain our flying skills and proficiency. The pilots who preferred to trust a malfunctioning autothrottle system (Scandinavian Airlines NTSB-AAR-84-15) over their own skills to land in a windshear are indicative of a cancer of confidence and an unhealthy overreliance on automation.
Finally, until such a time as someone designs a system which will prevent pilot complacency, situational awareness is the key to survival. We must find creative methods to keep our heads in the game. Challenge yourself, challenge your crewmates.

If the past is any indication of the future, good pilots will die, and likely take others with them, because they lost SA due to overreliance on automation. Don’t let it be you.


Quando usato in maniera appropriata e correttamente programmato il GPS può avere una capacità di posizionamento incredibilmente accurata da essere letteralmente un “salvagente”, come evidente da questa relazione di un ferry pilot su un aereo anfibio di lungo raggio durante una traversata sull’ Oceano Pacifico:

“Durante la traversata il motore sinistro cominciò improvvisamente a mostrare ritorni di fiamma e conseguentemente a perdere potenza. Il motore fu portato alla potenza necessaria per mantenere l’aereo in volo il più a lungo possibile, virando verso la terra più vicina, e lanciando una chiamata di emergenza. Più tardi, dopo essere ammarati con successo, l’aereo cominciò ad imbarcare acqua, e i passeggeri riuscirono a sistemarsi a bordo di una scialuppa di salvataggio.
Il coordinamento con gli enti del controllo del traffico aereo e una accurata posizione del GPS determinarono un veloce recupero da parte della guardia costiera, dopo appena poche ore dall’ammaraggio.”

È ovvio da queste relazioni che la disciplina dell’automazione è fondamentale per il successo, indipendentemente dal tipo di aereo.
È difficile dare raccomandazioni definitive che possono funzionare in qualsiasi contesto, ma ci sono molti aspetti, come risultato degli studi che possiamo prendere in considerazione.
Primo, dobbiamo avere la consapevolezza che la possibilità di errore è sempre presente. L’uomo e le macchine sono strani compagni, ci affidiamo a loro ma dobbiamo essere di capaci di preservare la nostra autonomia, il che ci porta alla seconda considerazione.
L’importanza di conoscere tutti i dettagli dell’automazione sull’aereo, in misura sufficiente per fidarsi del sistema, ma anche per mantenere un’atteggiamento di allerta. Le analisi degli incidenti indicano come spesso i piloti abbiano una velata diffidenza verso l’automazione, ma quello che più spaventa è che apparentemente molti piloti ne hanno ancora meno nelle loro capacità. Questo ci porta alla terza considerazione.
Prima che i sistemi di automazione siano in grado di sostituire completamente la nostra manualità, dobbiamo mantenere le nostre abilità e competenze. Il pilota che preferisce fidarsi di un auto-throttle difettoso (Scandinavian Airlines NTSB-AAR-84-15) piuttosto che sulle proprie capacità per far atterrare un DC-10 in presenza di windshear, indica quanto sbagliato possa essere avere un’eccessiva fiducia nell’automazione.
Infine, finché non verrà definito un sistema in grado di prevenire un eccessiva dipendenza dalle macchine, la chiave della sopravvivenza sarà la consapevolezza situazionale, trovando sistemi creativi per tenere la nostra mente allerta, sfidandosi continuamente.

L’insegnamento del passato ci suggerisce come molti piloti siano morti perdendo la consapevolezza situazionale a causa di una eccessiva fiducia nell’automazione.

Appena decollati da Marina di Campo

Annunci

The limits of the GPS



[…]
As the cost of Global Positioning System (GPS) units decrease, more pilots are using these devices to supplement their other navigational equipment. However, problems can arise if pilots fail to recognize that GPS is currently designed to be a supplemental, not a primary-navigational aid. A report from a corporate pilot illustrates:

“I departed on an IFR flight plan with an IFR-approved GPS. I was cleared direct to ABC, at which time I dialed ABC into the VOR portion of the GPS and punched “direct”. The heading was 040 degrees. After a few minutes, Approach inquired as to my routing, heading, etc. I stated direct ABC, 040 degrees, They suggested turning to 340 degrees for ABC. I was dumbfounded. My GPS receiver had locked to ADC, 3500 miles away in Norway!! Closer inspection revealed that my estimated time en route was 21 hours. I did not verify my position with the VOR receiver. I mistakenly, blindly, trusted a GPS!..!                  

Others reporters have found themselves somewhere other than where they wanted to be as a result of over-reliance on GPS. A general aviation pilot provided this example:

“I had recently purchased a hand-held GPS and was anxious to use my new acquisition. Without thinking, I punched in XYZ VOR and navigated along the direct route. I did not crosscheck myself and allowed myself to invade restricted airspace. I realize that this is a serious problem and a very stupid mistake.”             

Many hand-held GPS units have an inherent system limitation, as our next reporter discovered:

“Flying VFR, using a hand-held GPS for navigational reference. While en route, position and status seemed fine. According to the GPS position, a “big airport” was getting closer and closer, but still out of the overlying Class C airspace. From a visual standpoint, the position was definitely in Class C airspace. When I landed at ABC, the GPS indicated the location was XYZ (about 40 nm west). I turned the unit off, then back on, and the position now indicated ABC.                     
I called the manufacturer, which had received numerous calls about erroneous positions. A new satellite had been put in orbit; there were now a total of 26 satellites. My unit only showed 25. The manufacturer suggested leaving the GPS on for 45 minutes to acquire the information from the new satellite. I did so, and my unit now shows 26 satellites. The GPS positions seem correct. Conclusion: Use hand-held GPS as a supplemental reference.”                   

According to the reporter’s conversation with the manufacturer, hand-held GPS units currently in use do not have RAIM (Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitor) that is built into installed, IFR-certified units. If the signal is not sufficient, an error message will occur. This is analogous to the “OFF” flag showing on the VOR receiver when the aircraft is out of range for adequate signal acquisition.
Because of the inherent limitations of hand-held units, pilots should carry and use the appropriate charts as cross-reference material, rather than relying solely on GPS!
(to be continued)


Nel campo dell’aviazione generale, il decrescente costo dei dispositivi GPS portatili fa sì che sempre più piloti ne facciano uso come implementazione agli strumenti di navigazione. Da quest’uso disinvolto può nascere il problema del pilota che si dimentica di utilizzare il dispositivo non come un ausilio alla navigazione, bensì come fonte primaria, come descritto da questo pilota di aviazione generale:

“Ero in partenza per un volo IFR con un dispositivo GPS approvato per il volo IFR. Fui autorizzato a volare diretto al vor ABC, digitai il nominativo e la funzione “direct”. La prua era di 040. Dopo pochi minuti il controllore del traffico aereo chiese spiegazioni sulla rotta. Confermai diretto al vor ABC con prua 040. Mi suggerirono di virare per 340! Ero confuso..Il GPS aveva selezionato un VOR omonimo in Norvegia a 3500 miglia di distanza con un tempo di volo stimato di 21 ore! Non avevo verificato la posizione, mi ero fidato ciecamente!..”

Altri si sono trovati altrove rispetto alle loro intenzioni come risultato di una eccessiva fiducia nel GPS, come in quest’altro caso:

“Avevo appena acquistato un dispositivo mobile GPS ed ero ansioso di utilizzarlo. Senza pensarci troppo (!) digitai il nominativo del VOR e navigai in direzione della rotta indicata. Senza ulteriori verifiche invasi uno spazio aereo regolamentato. Realizzai la gravità del problema e quanto stupido l’errore.”

Molti GPS portatili hanno dei limiti come risulta da questa relazione:

“Volavo secondo le regole del volo VFR con un GPS portatile. Durante il volo la posizione e la rotta sembravano corrette, dalle informazioni sul monitor mi stavo avvicinando ad un grande aeroporto all’interno di uno spazio aereo di classe C. Atterrato ad ABC il GPS indicava che l’aeroporto in realtà era XYZ circa 40nm a ovest. Spento il GPS è riacceso di nuovo, indicava correttamente ABC.
Chiamai il produttore, che aveva già ricevuto numerose chiamate di utenti che segnalavano errori di posizione. Era stato lanciato in orbita un nuovo satellite (per un totale di 26), mentre il mio dispositivo ne indicava soltanto 25. Il produttore mi consigliò di lasciare acceso il dispositivo per 45 minuti così da acquisire le informazioni del nuovo satellite. A quel punto in effetti il GPS segnalava la ricezione di 26 satelliti, segnalando quindi correttamente la posizione. Conclusione: usare il GPS portatile solo come riferimento supplementare”

Dalla conversazione col produttore emerse che gli attuali GPS portatili sono privi di RAIM (Receiver Autonomus Integrity Monitor) che assicura loro la presenza di un segnale sufficientemente forte per la navigazione. Se il segnale è insufficiente verrà indicato un segnale di errore, al pari della bandierina off che indica nei VOR un segnale fuori dalla portata per una corretta acquisizione.
Proprio per queste limitazioni i piloti devono sempre affidarsi alle carte di navigazione, tutt’al più incrociando le informazioni con i dati del GPS!

In volo sugli Appennini

Automation and discipline


Automation in the cockpit can take many forms, from the use of a hand-held GPS in general aviation to the glass cockpit of an Airbus 320. Yet despite the huge differences in the level of sophistication, the two central questions for pilots who deal with automated aircraft systems are similar regardless of the aircraft type. “How much control do we relinquish to automated systems?” and “When do we take control back?“. In short, it is a question of trust.
The human factors associated with highly automated systems are still being worked out by both designers and operators, a point made clear by the differing approaches taken by different segments of the aviation industry. Moreover, in no other field than in aviation, technology has marked a steady growth and revolutionary trend. The civil airline industry led the way with the latest aircraft from Boeing, McDonnel Douglas, and Airbus, which all boast highly automated, two-person cockpit.
Automation is a technology that works best in predetermined situations which can be planned and programmed for ahead of time. However, technology does not always provide quick and easy flexibility when the external situation changes.
It has been said that automation should be used to perform functions that the human operator either cannot perform, performs poorly, or in which the human operator shows limitations. Even when the automation is functioning perfectly, pilots must keep track of what the aircraft is doing or the result can be devastating. Consider the pilots of KAL 007, who apparently allowed their automated navigation system to carry them into Soviet airspace, where they were intercepted and shot down by a Soviet fighter.
(to be continued)


In un cockpit l’automazione può prendere molte forme, da un GPS portatile montato su un aereo di aviazione generale al glass cockpit di un Airbus 320. Nonostante i diversi livelli di sofisticazione tecnologica, due sono le questioni che i piloti dovrebbero considerare quando alle prese con queste strumentazioni, indipendentemente dal tipo di aereo; quanta dell’automazione presente a bordo di un aereo è consigliabile usare, e quando è il momento di riprendere il controllo manuale?
Ad oggi non esistono orientamenti univoci relativamente alla disciplina dell’automazione, come risulta evidente dal diverso approccio intrapreso dai segmenti dell’industria aviatoria. Del resto in nessun altro campo come in quello dell’aviazione la tecnologia ha segnato un processo di crescita così costante e per certi versi rivoluzionario. L’industria della aviazione civile con gli ultimi modelli di Boeing, McDonnel Douglas ed Airbus lascia chiaramente intendere qual’e la strada intrapresa; aerei altamente tecnologici con strumentazioni altamente automatizzate.
L’automazione è una tecnologia che lavora al meglio in predeterminate situazioni che possono essere pianificate e programmare in anticipo, ma non sempre questa fornisce una flessibilità veloce e facile quando i fattori esterni cambiano.
È stato detto che l’automazione dovrebbe essere usata solo nei casi in cui l’operatore umano non può fornire prestazioni soddisfacenti, se non addirittura quando incapace di effettuarle, ed è bene sottolineare che anche quando l’automazione sta perfettamente funzionando il pilota deve continuamente monitore i progressi in volo, altrimenti, nei casi più gravi di malfunzionamento, il risultato può essere catastrofico come nel caso del volo KAL 007 il cui equipaggio permise al sistema di navigazione di portarli in spazio aereo sovietico per essere abbattuti da un caccia della difesa.

Sulla costa in direzione dell’Elba

Eccessiva fiducia vs. consapevolezza situazionale

eccessivafidcoscienzasituazionale
[…]
Quando usato in maniera appropriata e correttamente programmato il GPS può avere una capacità di posizionamento incredibilmente accurata da essere letteralmente un “salvagente”, come evidente da questa relazione di un ferry pilot su un aereo anfibio di lungo raggio durante una traversata sull’ Oceano Pacifico:

Durante la traversata il motore sinistro cominciò improvvisamente a mostrare ritorni di fiamma e conseguentemente a perdere potenza. Il motore fu portato alla potenza necessaria per mantenere l’aereo in volo il più a lungo possibile, virando verso la terra più vicina, e lanciando una chiamata di emergenza. Più tardi, dopo essere ammarati con successo, l’aereo cominciò ad imbarcare acqua, e i passeggeri riuscirono a sistemarsi a bordo di una scialuppa di salvataggio.
Il coordinamento con gli enti del controllo del traffico aereo e una accurata posizione del GPS determinarono un veloce recupero da parte della guardia costiera, dopo appena un’ora dall’ammaraggio.

È ovvio da queste relazioni che la disciplina dell’automazione è fondamentale per il successo, indipendentemente dal tipo di aereo.
È difficile dare raccomandazioni definitive che possono funzionare in qualsiasi contesto, ma ci sono molti aspetti, come risultato degli studi che possiamo prendere in considerazione.
Primo, dobbiamo avere la consapevolezza che la possibilità di errore è sempre presente. L’uomo e le macchine sono strani compagni, ci affidiamo a loro ma dobbiamo essere di capaci di preservare la nostra autonomia, il che ci porta alla seconda considerazione.
L’importanza di conoscere tutti i dettagli dell’automazione sull’aereo, in misura sufficiente per fidarsi del sistema, ma anche per mantenere un’atteggiamento di allerta. Le analisi degli incidenti indicano come spesso i piloti abbiano una velata diffidenza verso l’automazione, ma quello che più spaventa è che apparentemente molti piloti ne hanno ancora meno nelle loro capacità. Questo ci porta alla terza considerazione.
Prima che i sistemi di automazione siano in grado di sostituire completamente la nostra manualità, dobbiamo mantenere le nostre abilità e competenze. Il pilota che preferisce fidarsi di un auto-throttle difettoso (Scandinavian Airlines NTSB-AAR-84-15) piuttosto che sulle proprie capacità per far atterrare un DC-10 in presenza di windshear, indica quanto sbagliato possa essere avere un’eccessiva fiducia nell’automazione.
Infine, finché non verrà definito un sistema in grado di prevenire un eccessiva dipendenza dalle macchine, la chiave della sopravvivenza sarà la consapevolezza situazionale, trovando sistemi creativi per tenere la nostra mente allerta, sfidandosi continuamente.

L’insegnamento del passato ci suggerisce come molti piloti siano morti perdendo la consapevolezza situazionale a causa di una eccessiva fiducia nell’automazione.

FL90, in volo verso Roma

Eccessiva fiducia

eccessivafiducia
[…]
Nel campo dell’aviazione generale, il decrescente costo dei dispositivi GPS portatili fa sì che sempre più piloti ne facciano uso come implementazione agli strumenti di navigazione. Da quest’uso disinvolto può nascere il problema del pilota che si dimentica di utilizzare il dispositivo non come un ausilio alla navigazione, bensì come fonte primaria, come descritto da questo pilota di aviazione generale:

“Ero in partenza per un volo IFR con un dispositivo GPS approvato per il volo IFR. Fui autorizzato a volare diretto al vor ABC, digitai il nominativo e la funzione “direct”. La prua era di 040. Dopo pochi minuti il controllore del traffico aereo chiese spiegazioni sulla rotta. Confermai diretto al vor ABC con prua 040. Mi suggerirono di virare per 340! Ero confuso..Il GPS aveva selezionato un VOR omonimo in Norvegia a 3500 miglia di distanza con un tempo di volo stimato di 21 ore! Non avevo verificato la posizione, mi ero fidato ciecamente!..”

Altri si sono trovati altrove rispetto alle loro intenzioni come risultato di una eccessiva fiducia nel GPS, come in quest’altro caso:

“Avevo appena acquistato un dispositivo mobile GPS ed ero ansioso di utilizzarlo. Senza pensarci troppo (!) digitai il nominativo del VOR e navigai in direzione della rotta indicata. Senza ulteriori verifiche invasi uno spazio aereo regolamentato. Realizzai la gravità del problema e quanto stupido l’errore.”

Molti GPS portatili hanno dei limiti come risulta da questa relazione:

“Volavo secondo le regole del volo VFR con un GPS portatile. Durante il volo la posizione e la rotta sembravano corrette, dalle informazioni sul monitor mi stavo avvicinando ad un grande aeroporto all’interno di uno spazio aereo di classe C. Atterrato ad ABC il GPS indicava che l’aeroporto in realtà era XYZ circa 40nm a ovest. Spento il GPS è riacceso di nuovo, indicava correttamente ABC.
Chiamai il produttore, che aveva già ricevuto numerose chiamate di utenti che segnalavano errori di posizione. Era stato lanciato in orbita un nuovo satellite (per un totale di 26), mentre il mio dispositivo ne indicava soltanto 25. Il produttore mi consigliò di lasciare acceso il dispositivo per 45 minuti così da acquisire le informazioni del nuovo satellite. A quel punto in effetti il GPS segnalava la ricezione di 26 satelliti, segnalando quindi correttamente la posizione. Conclusione: usare il GPS portatile solo come riferimento supplementare”

Dalla conversazione col produttore emerse che gli attuali GPS portatili sono privi di RAIM (Receiver Autonomus Integrity Monitor) che assicura loro la presenza di un segnale sufficientemente forte per la navigazione. Se il segnale è insufficiente verrà indicato un segnale di errore, al pari della bandierina off che indica nei VOR un segnale fuori dalla portata per una corretta acquisizione.
Proprio per queste limitazioni i piloti devono sempre affidarsi alle carte di navigazione, tutt’al più incrociando le informazioni con i dati del GPS!
(segue)

Piombino, lungo la rotta per Marina di Campo

Automazione e disciplina

automazionedisciplina
In un cockpit l’automazione può prendere molte forme, da un GPS portatile montato su un aereo di aviazione generale al glass cockpit di un Airbus 320. Nonostante i diversi livelli di sofisticazione tecnologica, due sono le questioni che i piloti dovrebbero considerare quando alle prese con queste strumentazioni, indipendentemente dal tipo di aereo; quanta dell’automazione presente a bordo di un aereo è consigliabile usare, e quando è il momento di riprendere il controllo manuale?
Ad oggi non esistono orientamenti univoci relativamente alla disciplina dell’automazione, come risulta evidente dal diverso approccio intrapreso dai segmenti dell’industria aviatoria. Del resto in nessun altro campo come in quello dell’aviazione la tecnologia ha segnato un processo di crescita così costante e per certi versi rivoluzionario. L’industria della aviazione civile con gli ultimi modelli di Boeing, McDonnel Douglas ed Airbus lascia chiaramente intendere qual’e la strada intrapresa; aerei altamente tecnologici con strumentazioni altamente automatizzate.
L’automazione è una tecnologia che lavora al meglio in predeterminate situazioni che possono essere pianificate e programmare in anticipo, ma non sempre questa fornisce una flessibilità veloce e facile quando i fattori esterni cambiano.
È stato detto che l’automazione dovrebbe essere usata solo nei casi in cui l’operatore umano non può fornire prestazioni soddisfacenti, se non addirittura quando incapace di effettuarle, ed è bene sottolineare che anche quando l’automazione sta perfettamente funzionando il pilota deve continuamente monitore i progressi in volo, altrimenti, nei casi più gravi di malfunzionamento, il risultato può essere catastrofico come nel caso del volo KAL 007 il cui equipaggio permise al sistema di navigazione di portarli in spazio aereo sovietico per essere abbattuti dai caccia della difesa.
(segue)

Fl 90, salita iniziale di un Embraer